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science news Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://news.yahoo.com/science/ Get the latest Science news headlines from Yahoo News. Find breaking Science news, including analysis and opinion on top Science stories. en-US Copyright (c) 2014 Yahoo! Inc. All rights reserved Tue, 02 Dec 2014 11:07:01 -0500 5 Science News Headlines - Yahoo News http://news.yahoo.com/science/ http://l.yimg.com/rz/d/yahoo_news_en-US_s_f_p_168x21_news.png Gene studies suggest King Richard III was a blond, blue-eyed boy<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/gene-studies-suggest-king-richard-iii-blond-blue-160701952.html"><img src="http://l2.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/7gNNORW48Gwk63WvgibXAA--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/Reuters/2014-12-02T160701Z_1_LYNXNPEAB10P8_RTROPTP_2_BRITAIN.JPG" width="130" height="86" alt="A mock soldier&#039;s helmet is displayed on the Bosworth Battlefield where it is thought King Richard III lost his life near Market Bosworth" align="left" title="A mock soldier&#039;s helmet is displayed on the Bosworth Battlefield where it is thought King Richard III lost his life near Market Bosworth" border="0" /></a>LONDON (Reuters) - British scientists analyzing 500-year-old bones found under a car park say it is now beyond almost any doubt that the remains are of King Richard III, and that studies suggest he had blue eyes and blond hair as a boy. Publishing their latest findings in the journal Nature Communications, researchers from Leicester University also said DNA analysis showed a match between King Richard III and two modern female-line relatives. ...</p><br clear="all"/>http://news.yahoo.com/gene-studies-suggest-king-richard-iii-blond-blue-160701952.htmlTue, 02 Dec 2014 11:07:01 -0500Reutersgene-studies-suggest-king-richard-iii-blond-blue-160701952<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/gene-studies-suggest-king-richard-iii-blond-blue-160701952.html"><img src="http://l2.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/7gNNORW48Gwk63WvgibXAA--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/Reuters/2014-12-02T160701Z_1_LYNXNPEAB10P8_RTROPTP_2_BRITAIN.JPG" width="130" height="86" alt="A mock soldier&#039;s helmet is displayed on the Bosworth Battlefield where it is thought King Richard III lost his life near Market Bosworth" align="left" title="A mock soldier&#039;s helmet is displayed on the Bosworth Battlefield where it is thought King Richard III lost his life near Market Bosworth" border="0" /></a>LONDON (Reuters) - British scientists analyzing 500-year-old bones found under a car park say it is now beyond almost any doubt that the remains are of King Richard III, and that studies suggest he had blue eyes and blond hair as a boy. Publishing their latest findings in the journal Nature Communications, researchers from Leicester University also said DNA analysis showed a match between King Richard III and two modern female-line relatives. ...</p><br clear="all"/>Biogen plans late-stage Alzheimer's trial, shares riseBy Ransdell Pierson (Reuters) - Biogen Idec Inc's research chief on Tuesday said the company is planning a late-stage trial of its experimental treatment for Alzheimer's disease after the drug cut brain plaque levels and significantly improved cognition in a small early-stage study. Shares of Biogen, whose main drugs treat multiple sclerosis, were up 6 percent in midday trading on the Nasdaq. Douglas Williams, speaking at the Deutsche Bank BioFEST conference, said the encouraging data was seen in a Phase 1b trial of its BIIB037 drug. ...http://news.yahoo.com/biogen-plans-stage-trial-alzheimers-treatment-151044108--finance.htmlTue, 02 Dec 2014 12:00:29 -0500Reutersbiogen-plans-stage-trial-alzheimers-treatment-151044108--financeNo serious side effects in Merck/Newlink Ebola vaccine testBy Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - The first people vaccinated with an experimental Ebola shot being developed by Merck and NewLink have had no serious side effects so far, but a few experienced mild fever, Swiss researchers said on Tuesday. The shot, one of several being fast-tracked through clinical trials in the hope they can be approved for use in the Ebola epidemic raging in West Africa, is undergoing initial human safety tests at the University Hospitals of Geneva. "After his or her injection, each volunteer was kept under observation for 1. ...http://news.yahoo.com/no-serious-side-effects-merck-newlink-ebola-vaccine-103503413--finance.htmlTue, 02 Dec 2014 11:13:44 -0500Reutersno-serious-side-effects-merck-newlink-ebola-vaccine-103503413--financeEuropean ministers approve new Ariane 6 rocketBy Cyril Altmeyer LUXEMBOURG (Reuters) - European nations approved funding for a new Ariane 6 space rocket on Tuesday, pooling their resources in a single, simplified version to tackle growing international competition. The new, lower-cost rocket will replace the current Ariane 5 from its first launch in 2020, French Research Minister Genevieve Fioraso said after ministerial talks in Luxembourg. ...http://news.yahoo.com/european-ministers-approve-ariane-six-rocket-162606543--finance.htmlTue, 02 Dec 2014 13:59:40 -0500Reuterseuropean-ministers-approve-ariane-six-rocket-162606543--financeExclusive: First gene therapy drug sets million-euro price record<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/exclusive-first-gene-therapy-drug-sets-million-euro-173717146--finance.html"><img src="http://l2.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/8NCR04pR4DO6TVsmkUTWlQ--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/Reuters/2014-11-26T175259Z_2_LYNXNPEAAP0WQ_RTROPTP_2_HEALTH-RAREDISEASES.JPG" width="130" height="86" alt="An operator installs a chromatography column to purify the gene therapy drug Glybera at Dutch biotech company uniQure in Amsterdam" align="left" title="An operator installs a chromatography column to purify the gene therapy drug Glybera at Dutch biotech company uniQure in Amsterdam" border="0" /></a>By Ludwig Burger and Ben Hirschler FRANKFURT/LONDON (Reuters) - The Western world&#039;s first gene therapy drug is set to go on sale in Germany with a 1.1 million euro ($1.4 million) price tag, a new record for a medicine to treat a rare disease. The sky-high cost of Glybera, from Dutch biotech firm UniQure and its unlisted Italian marketing partner Chiesi, shows how single curative therapies to fix faulty genes may upend the conventional pharmaceutical business model. ...</p><br clear="all"/>http://news.yahoo.com/exclusive-first-gene-therapy-drug-sets-million-euro-173717146--finance.htmlWed, 26 Nov 2014 12:52:59 -0500Reutersexclusive-first-gene-therapy-drug-sets-million-euro-173717146--finance<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/exclusive-first-gene-therapy-drug-sets-million-euro-173717146--finance.html"><img src="http://l2.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/8NCR04pR4DO6TVsmkUTWlQ--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/Reuters/2014-11-26T175259Z_2_LYNXNPEAAP0WQ_RTROPTP_2_HEALTH-RAREDISEASES.JPG" width="130" height="86" alt="An operator installs a chromatography column to purify the gene therapy drug Glybera at Dutch biotech company uniQure in Amsterdam" align="left" title="An operator installs a chromatography column to purify the gene therapy drug Glybera at Dutch biotech company uniQure in Amsterdam" border="0" /></a>By Ludwig Burger and Ben Hirschler FRANKFURT/LONDON (Reuters) - The Western world&#039;s first gene therapy drug is set to go on sale in Germany with a 1.1 million euro ($1.4 million) price tag, a new record for a medicine to treat a rare disease. The sky-high cost of Glybera, from Dutch biotech firm UniQure and its unlisted Italian marketing partner Chiesi, shows how single curative therapies to fix faulty genes may upend the conventional pharmaceutical business model. ...</p><br clear="all"/>Actor Alan Alda Challenges Scientists to Explain 'What is Sleep?'<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/actor-alan-alda-challenges-scientists-explain-sleep-182811232.html"><img src="http://l2.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/BkrnG565yI.YTAXJpRzGew--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3B4b2ZmPTUwO3B5b2ZmPTA7cT03NTt3PTEzMA--/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/LiveScience.com/Alan-Alda-headshot.jpg1417533065" width="130" height="86" alt="Actor Alan Alda Challenges Scientists to Explain &#039;What is Sleep?&#039;" align="left" title="Actor Alan Alda Challenges Scientists to Explain &#039;What is Sleep?&#039;" border="0" /></a>The question may seem complex, but actor Alan Alda, renowned for his roles on the hit TV shows &quot;M*A*S*H&quot; and &quot;The West Wing,&quot; is asking researchers around the world to make the answer simple and understandable to the children, who will judge the entries. &quot;I think that 11-year-old kids are probably all reaching that point in their lives when they want answers to complicated questions, but they want them with clarity,&quot; said Alda, a visiting professor in the school of journalism at Stony Brook University, in New York. This is the fourth consecutive year that the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science, at Stony Brook University, has called on researchers to demystify tricky scientific concepts in what has been dubbed the &quot;Flame Challenge&quot; (since the inaugural challenge in 2011 sought an answer to the question &quot;What is a flame?&quot;).</p><br clear="all"/>http://news.yahoo.com/actor-alan-alda-challenges-scientists-explain-sleep-182811232.htmlTue, 02 Dec 2014 13:28:11 -0500LiveScience.comactor-alan-alda-challenges-scientists-explain-sleep-182811232<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/actor-alan-alda-challenges-scientists-explain-sleep-182811232.html"><img src="http://l2.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/BkrnG565yI.YTAXJpRzGew--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3B4b2ZmPTUwO3B5b2ZmPTA7cT03NTt3PTEzMA--/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/LiveScience.com/Alan-Alda-headshot.jpg1417533065" width="130" height="86" alt="Actor Alan Alda Challenges Scientists to Explain &#039;What is Sleep?&#039;" align="left" title="Actor Alan Alda Challenges Scientists to Explain &#039;What is Sleep?&#039;" border="0" /></a>The question may seem complex, but actor Alan Alda, renowned for his roles on the hit TV shows &quot;M*A*S*H&quot; and &quot;The West Wing,&quot; is asking researchers around the world to make the answer simple and understandable to the children, who will judge the entries. &quot;I think that 11-year-old kids are probably all reaching that point in their lives when they want answers to complicated questions, but they want them with clarity,&quot; said Alda, a visiting professor in the school of journalism at Stony Brook University, in New York. This is the fourth consecutive year that the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science, at Stony Brook University, has called on researchers to demystify tricky scientific concepts in what has been dubbed the &quot;Flame Challenge&quot; (since the inaugural challenge in 2011 sought an answer to the question &quot;What is a flame?&quot;).</p><br clear="all"/>It's Really Richard: DNA Confirms King's Remains<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/really-richard-dna-confirms-kings-remains-163712761.html"><img src="http://l1.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/GoLcd9PJMa8mh3lwKzpnXA--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/LiveScience.com/richard-iii-skull.jpg1417473934" width="130" height="86" alt="It&#039;s Really Richard: DNA Confirms King&#039;s Remains" align="left" title="It&#039;s Really Richard: DNA Confirms King&#039;s Remains" border="0" /></a>Battled-scarred bones found under an English parking lot two years ago really do belong to the medieval King Richard III, according to a new analysis of genetic and genealogical evidence. &quot;The evidence is overwhelming that these are indeed the remains of Richard III,&quot; University of Leicester geneticist Turi King said during a press conference.</p><br clear="all"/>http://news.yahoo.com/really-richard-dna-confirms-kings-remains-163712761.htmlTue, 02 Dec 2014 11:37:12 -0500LiveScience.comreally-richard-dna-confirms-kings-remains-163712761<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/really-richard-dna-confirms-kings-remains-163712761.html"><img src="http://l1.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/GoLcd9PJMa8mh3lwKzpnXA--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/LiveScience.com/richard-iii-skull.jpg1417473934" width="130" height="86" alt="It&#039;s Really Richard: DNA Confirms King&#039;s Remains" align="left" title="It&#039;s Really Richard: DNA Confirms King&#039;s Remains" border="0" /></a>Battled-scarred bones found under an English parking lot two years ago really do belong to the medieval King Richard III, according to a new analysis of genetic and genealogical evidence. &quot;The evidence is overwhelming that these are indeed the remains of Richard III,&quot; University of Leicester geneticist Turi King said during a press conference.</p><br clear="all"/>Drug Overdose-Related Deaths Double from 1999 to 2012The number of yearly deaths from drug overdoses in the United States more than doubled between 1999 and 2012, according to a new report. In 2012, more than 41,000 people died of drug overdoses in the United States, compared with about 17,000 in 1999, according to the report released today (Dec. 2) by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. However, the report also found that the number of yearly deaths due to an overdose of opioid pain relievers, such as oxycodone and hydrocodone, actually decreased 5 percent between 2011 and 2012. Still, about 16,000 of the deaths in 2012 involved opioid pain relievers, according to the report.http://news.yahoo.com/drug-overdose-related-deaths-double-1999-2012-152724494.htmlTue, 02 Dec 2014 10:27:24 -0500LiveScience.comdrug-overdose-related-deaths-double-1999-2012-152724494Star Trek, Marvel and Apollo Mementos Launching on NASA's Orion This Week<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/star-trek-marvel-apollo-mementos-launching-nasas-orion-183222587.html"><img src="http://l2.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/CwHUt4kmHu3FJgSPVxKFXw--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/SPACE.com/Star_Trek,_Marvel_and_Apollo-0d8842e4d75760f204be6bc7f3971978" width="130" height="86" alt="Star Trek, Marvel and Apollo Mementos Launching on NASA&#039;s Orion This Week" align="left" title="Star Trek, Marvel and Apollo Mementos Launching on NASA&#039;s Orion This Week" border="0" /></a>Captain Kirk, Iron Man, Sesame Street&#039;s Slimey the Worm, and a Tyrannosaurus Rex are set to lift off to space later this week on the first test flight of Orion, NASA&#039;s next-generation spacecraft. This eclectic &#039;crew&#039; flying aboard NASA&#039;s unmanned Orion Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1) are among the souvenirs and mementos packed for the four-hour, two-orbit mission. The Orion capsule with its cargo of sensors, instruments, and memorabilia is scheduled to launch Thursday (Dec. 4) at 7:05 a.m. EST (1205 GMT) on board a United Launch Alliance (ULA) Delta 4 Heavy rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.</p><br clear="all"/>http://news.yahoo.com/star-trek-marvel-apollo-mementos-launching-nasas-orion-183222587.htmlTue, 02 Dec 2014 13:32:22 -0500SPACE.comstar-trek-marvel-apollo-mementos-launching-nasas-orion-183222587<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/star-trek-marvel-apollo-mementos-launching-nasas-orion-183222587.html"><img src="http://l2.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/CwHUt4kmHu3FJgSPVxKFXw--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/SPACE.com/Star_Trek,_Marvel_and_Apollo-0d8842e4d75760f204be6bc7f3971978" width="130" height="86" alt="Star Trek, Marvel and Apollo Mementos Launching on NASA&#039;s Orion This Week" align="left" title="Star Trek, Marvel and Apollo Mementos Launching on NASA&#039;s Orion This Week" border="0" /></a>Captain Kirk, Iron Man, Sesame Street&#039;s Slimey the Worm, and a Tyrannosaurus Rex are set to lift off to space later this week on the first test flight of Orion, NASA&#039;s next-generation spacecraft. This eclectic &#039;crew&#039; flying aboard NASA&#039;s unmanned Orion Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1) are among the souvenirs and mementos packed for the four-hour, two-orbit mission. The Orion capsule with its cargo of sensors, instruments, and memorabilia is scheduled to launch Thursday (Dec. 4) at 7:05 a.m. EST (1205 GMT) on board a United Launch Alliance (ULA) Delta 4 Heavy rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.</p><br clear="all"/>How NASA's Landmark Orion Spacecraft Test Flight Will Work<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/nasas-landmark-orion-spacecraft-test-flight-153951371.html"><img src="http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/cmN04I4CQxiiERyfeblh.w--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/SPACE.com/How_NASA%27s_Landmark_Orion_Spacecraft-94de26a8092acd18c49811986f78be4e" width="130" height="86" alt="How NASA&#039;s Landmark Orion Spacecraft Test Flight Will Work" align="left" title="How NASA&#039;s Landmark Orion Spacecraft Test Flight Will Work" border="0" /></a>NASA is planning to launch a test mission for its newest space capsule designed to eventually bring humans deeper into space than ever before. The space agency is sending its first Orion space capsule thousands of miles above Earth for the first time, and officials expect to retrieve it again when it splashes down in the Pacific Ocean. &quot;The environment in the open ocean is a hazardous environment in and of itself,&quot; Jeremy Graeber, recovery director for the test flight, said during a news conference. &quot;Nominally, the vehicle coming down should not pose any threats to the recovery forces, but it&#039;s a test flight, so there are systems that we are not 100 percent sure we know what position they&#039;re in once we&#039;re splashed down.</p><br clear="all"/>http://news.yahoo.com/nasas-landmark-orion-spacecraft-test-flight-153951371.htmlTue, 02 Dec 2014 10:39:51 -0500SPACE.comnasas-landmark-orion-spacecraft-test-flight-153951371<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/nasas-landmark-orion-spacecraft-test-flight-153951371.html"><img src="http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/cmN04I4CQxiiERyfeblh.w--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/SPACE.com/How_NASA%27s_Landmark_Orion_Spacecraft-94de26a8092acd18c49811986f78be4e" width="130" height="86" alt="How NASA&#039;s Landmark Orion Spacecraft Test Flight Will Work" align="left" title="How NASA&#039;s Landmark Orion Spacecraft Test Flight Will Work" border="0" /></a>NASA is planning to launch a test mission for its newest space capsule designed to eventually bring humans deeper into space than ever before. The space agency is sending its first Orion space capsule thousands of miles above Earth for the first time, and officials expect to retrieve it again when it splashes down in the Pacific Ocean. &quot;The environment in the open ocean is a hazardous environment in and of itself,&quot; Jeremy Graeber, recovery director for the test flight, said during a news conference. &quot;Nominally, the vehicle coming down should not pose any threats to the recovery forces, but it&#039;s a test flight, so there are systems that we are not 100 percent sure we know what position they&#039;re in once we&#039;re splashed down.</p><br clear="all"/>Ignoring indigenous rights in Amazon fuels global warming: studyBy Chris Arsenault ROME (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - More than half the carbon in the Amazon region could be released into the atmosphere unless indigenous land rights are protected, a new study said on Tuesday, as a UN climate conference got under way in Peru. Indigenous territories and protected natural areas across nine South American countries account for more than half the carbon stored in the Amazon, the study published in the journal Carbon Management reported. ...http://news.yahoo.com/ignoring-indigenous-rights-amazon-fuels-global-warming-study-190614032.htmlTue, 02 Dec 2014 14:06:14 -0500Reutersignoring-indigenous-rights-amazon-fuels-global-warming-study-190614032Actor challenges scientists: Explain sleep to kids<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/actor-challenges-scientists-explain-sleep-kids-162441458.html"><img src="http://l1.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/m8p7wg2LiahVR2zSylKxFQ--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/ap_webfeeds/9026835753f0182f670f6a70670043f9.jpg" width="130" height="86" alt="FILE - In this Friday, April 26, 2013 photo, actor Alan Alda listens during an interview at Stony Brook University, on New York&#039;s Long Island. Alda has a new challenge for scientists: Explain sleep to an 11-year-old. He started the annual “Flame Challenge” contest in 2011. It asks scientists to explain complex concepts in ways a child can understand. Scientists have until Feb. 13, 2015 to submit their answers about sleep in writing, video or graphics. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)" align="left" title="FILE - In this Friday, April 26, 2013 photo, actor Alan Alda listens during an interview at Stony Brook University, on New York&#039;s Long Island. Alda has a new challenge for scientists: Explain sleep to an 11-year-old. He started the annual “Flame Challenge” contest in 2011. It asks scientists to explain complex concepts in ways a child can understand. Scientists have until Feb. 13, 2015 to submit their answers about sleep in writing, video or graphics. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)" border="0" /></a>MINEOLA, N.Y. (AP) — Actor-turned-part-time professor Alan Alda has a new challenge for scientists: Explain sleep to an 11-year-old.</p><br clear="all"/>http://news.yahoo.com/actor-challenges-scientists-explain-sleep-kids-162441458.htmlTue, 02 Dec 2014 14:04:44 -0500Associated Pressactor-challenges-scientists-explain-sleep-kids-162441458<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/actor-challenges-scientists-explain-sleep-kids-162441458.html"><img src="http://l1.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/m8p7wg2LiahVR2zSylKxFQ--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/ap_webfeeds/9026835753f0182f670f6a70670043f9.jpg" width="130" height="86" alt="FILE - In this Friday, April 26, 2013 photo, actor Alan Alda listens during an interview at Stony Brook University, on New York&#039;s Long Island. Alda has a new challenge for scientists: Explain sleep to an 11-year-old. He started the annual “Flame Challenge” contest in 2011. It asks scientists to explain complex concepts in ways a child can understand. Scientists have until Feb. 13, 2015 to submit their answers about sleep in writing, video or graphics. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)" align="left" title="FILE - In this Friday, April 26, 2013 photo, actor Alan Alda listens during an interview at Stony Brook University, on New York&#039;s Long Island. Alda has a new challenge for scientists: Explain sleep to an 11-year-old. He started the annual “Flame Challenge” contest in 2011. It asks scientists to explain complex concepts in ways a child can understand. Scientists have until Feb. 13, 2015 to submit their answers about sleep in writing, video or graphics. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)" border="0" /></a>MINEOLA, N.Y. (AP) — Actor-turned-part-time professor Alan Alda has a new challenge for scientists: Explain sleep to an 11-year-old.</p><br clear="all"/>Invisible Dark Matter May Show Up in GPS Signals<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/invisible-dark-matter-may-show-gps-signals-121018594.html"><img src="http://l3.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/iTyH1mmWwGmdG5kRSkKETA--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3B4b2ZmPTUwO3B5b2ZmPTA7cT03NTt3PTEzMA--/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/LiveScience.com/dark-matter.jpg1417465278" width="130" height="86" alt="Invisible Dark Matter May Show Up in GPS Signals" align="left" title="Invisible Dark Matter May Show Up in GPS Signals" border="0" /></a>GPS satellites are crucial for navigation, but now researchers think this technology could be used for an unexpected purpose: finding traces of enigmatic dark matter that is thought to lurk throughout the universe. Without the extra force of gravity from dark matter, researchers say, galaxies wouldn&#039;t be able to hold themselves together. Physicists don&#039;t know what dark matter is made of, but some think it&#039;s composed of particles that barely interact with the visible world, which is why dark matter is invisible and has been difficult to detect. However, Andrei Derevianko, a professor of physics at the University of Nevada, Reno, and Maxim Pospelov, a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Victoria, British Columbia, have proposed that dark matter isn&#039;t made of particles at all.</p><br clear="all"/>http://news.yahoo.com/invisible-dark-matter-may-show-gps-signals-121018594.htmlTue, 02 Dec 2014 07:10:18 -0500LiveScience.cominvisible-dark-matter-may-show-gps-signals-121018594<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/invisible-dark-matter-may-show-gps-signals-121018594.html"><img src="http://l3.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/iTyH1mmWwGmdG5kRSkKETA--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3B4b2ZmPTUwO3B5b2ZmPTA7cT03NTt3PTEzMA--/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/LiveScience.com/dark-matter.jpg1417465278" width="130" height="86" alt="Invisible Dark Matter May Show Up in GPS Signals" align="left" title="Invisible Dark Matter May Show Up in GPS Signals" border="0" /></a>GPS satellites are crucial for navigation, but now researchers think this technology could be used for an unexpected purpose: finding traces of enigmatic dark matter that is thought to lurk throughout the universe. Without the extra force of gravity from dark matter, researchers say, galaxies wouldn&#039;t be able to hold themselves together. Physicists don&#039;t know what dark matter is made of, but some think it&#039;s composed of particles that barely interact with the visible world, which is why dark matter is invisible and has been difficult to detect. However, Andrei Derevianko, a professor of physics at the University of Nevada, Reno, and Maxim Pospelov, a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Victoria, British Columbia, have proposed that dark matter isn&#039;t made of particles at all.</p><br clear="all"/>8 Ways You Can See Einstein's Theory of Relativity in Real LifeFormulated by Albert Einstein in 1905, the theory of relativity is the notion that the laws of physics are the same everywhere. If you take a loop of wire and move it through a magnetic field, you generate an electric current.http://news.yahoo.com/8-ways-see-einsteins-theory-relativity-real-life-121050731.htmlMon, 01 Dec 2014 07:10:50 -0500LiveScience.com8-ways-see-einsteins-theory-relativity-real-life-121050731Does Intermittent Fasting Have Benefits? Science Suggests YesInstead of eating three square meals a day, an eating schedule that involves "intermittent fasting" could help fight not just obesity but many related diseases of modern life, such as diabetes, heart disease, cancer and Alzheimer's, researchers say. In fact, the most common eating pattern in modern societies of three meals daily, plus snacks, is abnormal from the perspective of human evolution, an international group of researchers wrote in an article published online Nov. 17 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. More and more research shows that intermittent fasting could have benefits, they said. "Fasting alone is more powerful in preventing and reversing some diseases than drugs," said Satchidananda Panda, an associate professor of regulatory biology at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in San Diego, California, and one of the co-authors of the article.http://news.yahoo.com/does-intermittent-fasting-benefits-science-suggests-yes-173453757.htmlFri, 28 Nov 2014 12:34:53 -0500LiveScience.comdoes-intermittent-fasting-benefits-science-suggests-yes-173453757Thanksgiving Science: Why Gratitude Is Good for YouThanksgiving may be the only major American holiday focused on giving thanks for all of life's blessings, but gratitude isn't just a good excuse for chowing down on turkey and pumpkin pie; it's also a way to promote good health and well-being, experts say.http://news.yahoo.com/thanksgiving-science-why-gratitude-good-120612045.htmlWed, 26 Nov 2014 07:06:12 -0500LiveScience.comthanksgiving-science-why-gratitude-good-120612045One for every leg: scientists map centipede genome<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/one-every-leg-scientists-map-centipede-genome-202014136.html"><img src="http://l3.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/oxPq1tpuMRk1_AkcC9Ld1g--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/Reuters/2014-11-25T202014Z_1_LYNXNPEAAO14H_RTROPTP_2_USA.JPG" width="130" height="86" alt="&quot;Bug Chef&quot; David Gordon holds a Vietnamese centipede during his 4th annual &quot;Bug-A-Thon&quot; event at Ripley&#039;s Believe It or Not museum in Hollywood" align="left" title="&quot;Bug Chef&quot; David Gordon holds a Vietnamese centipede during his 4th annual &quot;Bug-A-Thon&quot; event at Ripley&#039;s Believe It or Not museum in Hollywood" border="0" /></a>LONDON (Reuters) - An international team of more than 100 researchers has mapped the genome of the centipede and found that, while it easily outpaces humans on number of legs, it falls short when it comes to genes. Sequencing the genome of Strigamia maritima, a northern European centipede, the 106-strong team found it has around 15,000 genes - some 7,000 fewer than a human. ...</p><br clear="all"/>http://news.yahoo.com/one-every-leg-scientists-map-centipede-genome-202014136.htmlTue, 25 Nov 2014 15:20:14 -0500Reutersone-every-leg-scientists-map-centipede-genome-202014136<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/one-every-leg-scientists-map-centipede-genome-202014136.html"><img src="http://l3.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/oxPq1tpuMRk1_AkcC9Ld1g--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/Reuters/2014-11-25T202014Z_1_LYNXNPEAAO14H_RTROPTP_2_USA.JPG" width="130" height="86" alt="&quot;Bug Chef&quot; David Gordon holds a Vietnamese centipede during his 4th annual &quot;Bug-A-Thon&quot; event at Ripley&#039;s Believe It or Not museum in Hollywood" align="left" title="&quot;Bug Chef&quot; David Gordon holds a Vietnamese centipede during his 4th annual &quot;Bug-A-Thon&quot; event at Ripley&#039;s Believe It or Not museum in Hollywood" border="0" /></a>LONDON (Reuters) - An international team of more than 100 researchers has mapped the genome of the centipede and found that, while it easily outpaces humans on number of legs, it falls short when it comes to genes. Sequencing the genome of Strigamia maritima, a northern European centipede, the 106-strong team found it has around 15,000 genes - some 7,000 fewer than a human. ...</p><br clear="all"/>'Interstellar' Science: Is Wormhole Travel Possible?<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/interstellar-science-wormhole-travel-possible-144618553.html"><img src="http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/i0zV.EMF8nKCHrWkjVcobw--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3B4b2ZmPTUwO3B5b2ZmPTA7cT03NTt3PTEzMA--/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/SPACE.com/%27Interstellar%27_Science_Is_Wormhole_Travel-fac11490bc086c4313440d986ceb3800" width="130" height="86" alt="&#039;Interstellar&#039; Science: Is Wormhole Travel Possible?" align="left" title="&#039;Interstellar&#039; Science: Is Wormhole Travel Possible?" border="0" /></a>Wormholes are theoretical tunnels through the fabric of space-time that could potentially allow rapid travel between widely separated points — from one galaxy to another, for example, as depicted in Christopher Nolan&#039;s &quot;Interstellar,&quot; which opened in theaters around the world earlier this month. The novel came out in 1985, while the movie (which also stars Matthew McConaughey, apparently a wormhole connoisseur) was released in 1997.</p><br clear="all"/>http://news.yahoo.com/interstellar-science-wormhole-travel-possible-144618553.htmlTue, 25 Nov 2014 09:46:18 -0500SPACE.cominterstellar-science-wormhole-travel-possible-144618553<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/interstellar-science-wormhole-travel-possible-144618553.html"><img src="http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/i0zV.EMF8nKCHrWkjVcobw--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3B4b2ZmPTUwO3B5b2ZmPTA7cT03NTt3PTEzMA--/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/SPACE.com/%27Interstellar%27_Science_Is_Wormhole_Travel-fac11490bc086c4313440d986ceb3800" width="130" height="86" alt="&#039;Interstellar&#039; Science: Is Wormhole Travel Possible?" align="left" title="&#039;Interstellar&#039; Science: Is Wormhole Travel Possible?" border="0" /></a>Wormholes are theoretical tunnels through the fabric of space-time that could potentially allow rapid travel between widely separated points — from one galaxy to another, for example, as depicted in Christopher Nolan&#039;s &quot;Interstellar,&quot; which opened in theaters around the world earlier this month. The novel came out in 1985, while the movie (which also stars Matthew McConaughey, apparently a wormhole connoisseur) was released in 1997.</p><br clear="all"/>Cosmic Case of Missing Stars Baffles Scientists<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/cosmic-case-missing-stars-baffles-scientists-121435471.html"><img src="http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/NtZBANfWrOwaesmSgpjGsA--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/SPACE.com/Cosmic_Case_of_Missing_Stars-671d9853649ed669c8c657bacdb704db" width="130" height="86" alt="Cosmic Case of Missing Stars Baffles Scientists" align="left" title="Cosmic Case of Missing Stars Baffles Scientists" border="0" /></a>A massive population of stars is missing, and scientists are stumped as to where it could be. New observations from the Hubble Space Telescope challenge a previous theory for the apparent disappearance of a massive number of stars. Because some star clusters around our Milky Way galaxy have fewer stars than observations suggest they should, astronomers suspected many of these stars were ejected from their clusters to ultimately find new homes in the Milky Way. &quot;If these kicked-out stars were there, we would see them — but we don&#039;t!&quot; Frank Grundahl of Aarhus University in Denmark, a co-author on the paper, said in a statement. The finding draws into question whether the missing stars were ever present at all, in globular clusters around Fornax or the Milky Way.</p><br clear="all"/>http://news.yahoo.com/cosmic-case-missing-stars-baffles-scientists-121435471.htmlTue, 25 Nov 2014 07:14:35 -0500SPACE.comcosmic-case-missing-stars-baffles-scientists-121435471<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/cosmic-case-missing-stars-baffles-scientists-121435471.html"><img src="http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/NtZBANfWrOwaesmSgpjGsA--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/SPACE.com/Cosmic_Case_of_Missing_Stars-671d9853649ed669c8c657bacdb704db" width="130" height="86" alt="Cosmic Case of Missing Stars Baffles Scientists" align="left" title="Cosmic Case of Missing Stars Baffles Scientists" border="0" /></a>A massive population of stars is missing, and scientists are stumped as to where it could be. New observations from the Hubble Space Telescope challenge a previous theory for the apparent disappearance of a massive number of stars. Because some star clusters around our Milky Way galaxy have fewer stars than observations suggest they should, astronomers suspected many of these stars were ejected from their clusters to ultimately find new homes in the Milky Way. &quot;If these kicked-out stars were there, we would see them — but we don&#039;t!&quot; Frank Grundahl of Aarhus University in Denmark, a co-author on the paper, said in a statement. The finding draws into question whether the missing stars were ever present at all, in globular clusters around Fornax or the Milky Way.</p><br clear="all"/>Nobel Medal for DNA discovery could fetch $3.5 million at auctionBy Patricia Reaney NEW YORK (Reuters) - A Nobel Prize gold medal awarded to American scientist Dr. James Watson, a co-discoverer of DNA, is expected to sell for up to $3.5 million at auction next month in New York, Christie's said on Monday. Watson, along with Francis Crick and Maurice Wilkins, unraveled the double-helix structure and function of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in England in 1953 in a discovery that heralded the modern era of biology. The medal, the first to be offered by a living recipient, will go under the hammer on Dec. 4, with a pre-sale estimate of $2.5 million to $3. ...http://news.yahoo.com/nobel-medal-dna-discovery-could-fetch-3-5-140204421.htmlMon, 24 Nov 2014 09:02:04 -0500Reutersnobel-medal-dna-discovery-could-fetch-3-5-140204421Small Volcanic Eruptions Slow Global Warming<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/small-volcanic-eruptions-slow-global-warming-132458933.html"><img src="http://l3.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/kZMQx0BOoLIHcm4QQZ8fgw--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/LiveScience.com/sarychev.jpg1416515062" width="130" height="86" alt="Small Volcanic Eruptions Slow Global Warming" align="left" title="Small Volcanic Eruptions Slow Global Warming" border="0" /></a>Small volcanic eruptions account for part of the global warming slowdown since 2000, a new study suggests. Until now, the climate impacts of small volcanic blasts were overlooked because their planet-cooling particles cluster below the reach of satellites, scientists reported Oct. 31 in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. The stratosphere is the second layer of Earth&#039;s atmosphere, above the one in which humans live (the troposphere). Closer to the polar regions, the boundary drops to about 6 miles (10 km), said lead study author David Ridley, an atmospheric scientist at MIT.</p><br clear="all"/>http://news.yahoo.com/small-volcanic-eruptions-slow-global-warming-132458933.htmlFri, 21 Nov 2014 08:24:58 -0500LiveScience.comsmall-volcanic-eruptions-slow-global-warming-132458933<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/small-volcanic-eruptions-slow-global-warming-132458933.html"><img src="http://l3.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/kZMQx0BOoLIHcm4QQZ8fgw--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/LiveScience.com/sarychev.jpg1416515062" width="130" height="86" alt="Small Volcanic Eruptions Slow Global Warming" align="left" title="Small Volcanic Eruptions Slow Global Warming" border="0" /></a>Small volcanic eruptions account for part of the global warming slowdown since 2000, a new study suggests. Until now, the climate impacts of small volcanic blasts were overlooked because their planet-cooling particles cluster below the reach of satellites, scientists reported Oct. 31 in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. The stratosphere is the second layer of Earth&#039;s atmosphere, above the one in which humans live (the troposphere). Closer to the polar regions, the boundary drops to about 6 miles (10 km), said lead study author David Ridley, an atmospheric scientist at MIT.</p><br clear="all"/>Obama plugs science, math education at ceremony<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/obama-plugs-science-math-education-180733541.html"><img src="http://l3.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/7DN1PAeOwGU4wn2.sQ.uIQ--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/ap_webfeeds/65d10f60a372f82d650f6a706700bce8.jpg" width="130" height="86" alt="President Barack Obama holds up a compact flash memory card as an example of technology innovations during his remarks in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 20, 2014, before awarding the National Medals of Science and National Medals of Technology and Innovation. The awards are the highest honor bestowed by the United States Government upon scientists, engineers, and inventors. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)" align="left" title="President Barack Obama holds up a compact flash memory card as an example of technology innovations during his remarks in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 20, 2014, before awarding the National Medals of Science and National Medals of Technology and Innovation. The awards are the highest honor bestowed by the United States Government upon scientists, engineers, and inventors. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)" border="0" /></a>WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama said Thursday that 19 scientists, researchers and innovators who received the country&#039;s highest honor for their life-changing work embody the spirit of the nation and its &quot;sense that we push against limits and that we&#039;re not afraid to ask questions.&quot;</p><br clear="all"/>http://news.yahoo.com/obama-plugs-science-math-education-180733541.htmlThu, 20 Nov 2014 13:55:05 -0500Associated Pressobama-plugs-science-math-education-180733541<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/obama-plugs-science-math-education-180733541.html"><img src="http://l3.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/7DN1PAeOwGU4wn2.sQ.uIQ--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/ap_webfeeds/65d10f60a372f82d650f6a706700bce8.jpg" width="130" height="86" alt="President Barack Obama holds up a compact flash memory card as an example of technology innovations during his remarks in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 20, 2014, before awarding the National Medals of Science and National Medals of Technology and Innovation. The awards are the highest honor bestowed by the United States Government upon scientists, engineers, and inventors. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)" align="left" title="President Barack Obama holds up a compact flash memory card as an example of technology innovations during his remarks in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Nov. 20, 2014, before awarding the National Medals of Science and National Medals of Technology and Innovation. The awards are the highest honor bestowed by the United States Government upon scientists, engineers, and inventors. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)" border="0" /></a>WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama said Thursday that 19 scientists, researchers and innovators who received the country&#039;s highest honor for their life-changing work embody the spirit of the nation and its &quot;sense that we push against limits and that we&#039;re not afraid to ask questions.&quot;</p><br clear="all"/>Parallel Worlds Could Explain Wacky Quantum Physics<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/parallel-worlds-could-explain-wacky-quantum-physics-140403032.html"><img src="http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/s2nfx0NASuZtegEa88Ikgw--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3B4b2ZmPTUwO3B5b2ZmPTA7cT03NTt3PTEzMA--/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/LiveScience.com/multiverse.jpg1416349539" width="130" height="86" alt="Parallel Worlds Could Explain Wacky Quantum Physics" align="left" title="Parallel Worlds Could Explain Wacky Quantum Physics" border="0" /></a>The idea that an infinite number of parallel worlds could exist alongside our own is hard to wrap the mind around, but a version of this so-called Many Worlds theory could provide an answer to the controversial idea of quantum mechanics and its many different interpretations. Bill Poirier, a professor of physics at Texas Tech University in Lubbock, proposed a theory that not only assumes parallel worlds exist, but also says their interaction can explain all the quantum mechanics &quot;weirdness&quot; in the observable universe. Poirier first published the idea four years ago, but other physicists have recently started building on the idea and have demonstrated that it is mathematically possible. Quantum mechanics is the branch of physics that describes the rules that govern the universe on the microscopic scale.</p><br clear="all"/>http://news.yahoo.com/parallel-worlds-could-explain-wacky-quantum-physics-140403032.htmlThu, 20 Nov 2014 09:04:03 -0500LiveScience.comparallel-worlds-could-explain-wacky-quantum-physics-140403032<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/parallel-worlds-could-explain-wacky-quantum-physics-140403032.html"><img src="http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/s2nfx0NASuZtegEa88Ikgw--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3B4b2ZmPTUwO3B5b2ZmPTA7cT03NTt3PTEzMA--/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/LiveScience.com/multiverse.jpg1416349539" width="130" height="86" alt="Parallel Worlds Could Explain Wacky Quantum Physics" align="left" title="Parallel Worlds Could Explain Wacky Quantum Physics" border="0" /></a>The idea that an infinite number of parallel worlds could exist alongside our own is hard to wrap the mind around, but a version of this so-called Many Worlds theory could provide an answer to the controversial idea of quantum mechanics and its many different interpretations. Bill Poirier, a professor of physics at Texas Tech University in Lubbock, proposed a theory that not only assumes parallel worlds exist, but also says their interaction can explain all the quantum mechanics &quot;weirdness&quot; in the observable universe. Poirier first published the idea four years ago, but other physicists have recently started building on the idea and have demonstrated that it is mathematically possible. Quantum mechanics is the branch of physics that describes the rules that govern the universe on the microscopic scale.</p><br clear="all"/>CERN scientists discover 2 new subatomic particlesGENEVA (AP) — Scientists at the world's largest smasher said Wednesday they have discovered two new subatomic particles never seen before that could widen our understanding of the universe.http://news.yahoo.com/cern-scientists-discover-2-subatomic-particles-110634948.htmlWed, 19 Nov 2014 07:20:06 -0500Associated Presscern-scientists-discover-2-subatomic-particles-110634948Israeli XPrize Mission Science Twist: Map Lunar Magnetism (Op-Ed)<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/israeli-xprize-mission-science-twist-map-lunar-magnetism-210605850.html"><img src="http://l3.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/MhCdByf9CZRJHhvCpCNzyQ--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/LiveScience.com/magnetometer.jpg1415690076" width="130" height="86" alt="Israeli XPrize Mission Science Twist: Map Lunar Magnetism (Op-Ed)" align="left" title="Israeli XPrize Mission Science Twist: Map Lunar Magnetism (Op-Ed)" border="0" /></a>With the goal of landing the first Israeli spacecraft on the moon, nonprofit SpaceIL is competing for the Google Lunar XPrize: a modern race to the moon. First, instead of developing a rover to drive 500 m like most other teams, SpaceIL engineers are pursuing a &quot;hop&quot; — using the spacecraft&#039;s propulsion system first to land, and second to take off again and land 500 m away. Second, we are using the mission not only to stimulate technological advancement, but also to investigate the lunar magnetic field: To that aim, SpaceIL will be carrying a scientific experiment that will advance humanity&#039;s shared understanding of the moon. Although magnetized rocks were discovered decades ago, and astronauts returned some samples to Earth for research, the origin of the magnetic field presents an enigma — and an opportunity.</p><br clear="all"/>http://news.yahoo.com/israeli-xprize-mission-science-twist-map-lunar-magnetism-210605850.htmlTue, 18 Nov 2014 16:06:05 -0500LiveScience.comisraeli-xprize-mission-science-twist-map-lunar-magnetism-210605850<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/israeli-xprize-mission-science-twist-map-lunar-magnetism-210605850.html"><img src="http://l3.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/MhCdByf9CZRJHhvCpCNzyQ--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/LiveScience.com/magnetometer.jpg1415690076" width="130" height="86" alt="Israeli XPrize Mission Science Twist: Map Lunar Magnetism (Op-Ed)" align="left" title="Israeli XPrize Mission Science Twist: Map Lunar Magnetism (Op-Ed)" border="0" /></a>With the goal of landing the first Israeli spacecraft on the moon, nonprofit SpaceIL is competing for the Google Lunar XPrize: a modern race to the moon. First, instead of developing a rover to drive 500 m like most other teams, SpaceIL engineers are pursuing a &quot;hop&quot; — using the spacecraft&#039;s propulsion system first to land, and second to take off again and land 500 m away. Second, we are using the mission not only to stimulate technological advancement, but also to investigate the lunar magnetic field: To that aim, SpaceIL will be carrying a scientific experiment that will advance humanity&#039;s shared understanding of the moon. Although magnetized rocks were discovered decades ago, and astronauts returned some samples to Earth for research, the origin of the magnetic field presents an enigma — and an opportunity.</p><br clear="all"/>NASA Pluto Probe to Wake From Hibernation Next Month<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/nasa-pluto-probe-wake-hibernation-next-month-163537445.html"><img src="http://l2.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/xiQ6S87uTNNd2Cm0Yhxrhg--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/SPACE.com/NASA_Pluto_Probe_to_Wake-e97e2482458ebc108ef0295e29c28d4b" width="130" height="86" alt="NASA Pluto Probe to Wake From Hibernation Next Month" align="left" title="NASA Pluto Probe to Wake From Hibernation Next Month" border="0" /></a>NASA&#039;s New Horizons probe is about to wake up from a long slumber and get ready for its highly anticipated Pluto flyby next summer. New Horizons is scheduled to emerge from a 99-day hibernation on Dec. 6, then gear up for a six-month Pluto encounter that peaks with the first-ever close flyby of the mysterious dwarf planet on July 14, 2015. “New Horizons is healthy and cruising quietly through deep space, nearly 3 billion miles [4.8 billion kilometers] from home, but its rest is nearly over,&quot; Alice Bowman, New Horizons mission operations manager at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland, said in a statement. New Horizons launched in January 2006.</p><br clear="all"/>http://news.yahoo.com/nasa-pluto-probe-wake-hibernation-next-month-163537445.htmlTue, 18 Nov 2014 11:35:37 -0500SPACE.comnasa-pluto-probe-wake-hibernation-next-month-163537445<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/nasa-pluto-probe-wake-hibernation-next-month-163537445.html"><img src="http://l2.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/xiQ6S87uTNNd2Cm0Yhxrhg--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/SPACE.com/NASA_Pluto_Probe_to_Wake-e97e2482458ebc108ef0295e29c28d4b" width="130" height="86" alt="NASA Pluto Probe to Wake From Hibernation Next Month" align="left" title="NASA Pluto Probe to Wake From Hibernation Next Month" border="0" /></a>NASA&#039;s New Horizons probe is about to wake up from a long slumber and get ready for its highly anticipated Pluto flyby next summer. New Horizons is scheduled to emerge from a 99-day hibernation on Dec. 6, then gear up for a six-month Pluto encounter that peaks with the first-ever close flyby of the mysterious dwarf planet on July 14, 2015. “New Horizons is healthy and cruising quietly through deep space, nearly 3 billion miles [4.8 billion kilometers] from home, but its rest is nearly over,&quot; Alice Bowman, New Horizons mission operations manager at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland, said in a statement. New Horizons launched in January 2006.</p><br clear="all"/>Scientists 'confident' comet lander will wake upBERLIN (AP) — A burst of sunshine in the spring could be just the wakeup call for Europe's comet lander.http://news.yahoo.com/results-comet-landers-experiments-expected-072322857.htmlMon, 17 Nov 2014 17:46:38 -0500Associated Pressresults-comet-landers-experiments-expected-072322857Big Bang's Echo May Reveal Skeleton of the Universe<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/big-bangs-echo-may-reveal-skeleton-universe-214057537.html"><img src="http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/XtaJyeNM1c5itf1n3.LddA--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/SPACE.com/Big_Bang%27s_Echo_May_Reveal-4a7a249136e4b70302ebf48a4cd9cb53" width="130" height="86" alt="Big Bang&#039;s Echo May Reveal Skeleton of the Universe" align="left" title="Big Bang&#039;s Echo May Reveal Skeleton of the Universe" border="0" /></a>Scientists may soon get a look at the universe&#039;s skeleton by taking a close look at light left over from the Big Bang, which can be used to reveal the presence of matter like stars, galaxies, black holes and even larger structures in the otherwise empty universe. In a similar way, scientists with the international POLARBEAR collaboration want to use a diffuse light that fills every corner of the cosmos to indicate where there is matter and where there is none. POLARBEAR studies the cosmic microwave background (CMB) — the surviving light from the infant universe that is normally seen a kind of baby picture of the cosmos. &quot;We&#039;re using the light that we&#039;ve usually used to measure the seeds of the structure of the universe, to measure the whole tree,&quot; said Adrian Lee, a professor of physics at the University of California Berkeley, and a lead scientist with POLARBEAR.</p><br clear="all"/>http://news.yahoo.com/big-bangs-echo-may-reveal-skeleton-universe-214057537.htmlMon, 17 Nov 2014 16:40:57 -0500SPACE.combig-bangs-echo-may-reveal-skeleton-universe-214057537<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/big-bangs-echo-may-reveal-skeleton-universe-214057537.html"><img src="http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/XtaJyeNM1c5itf1n3.LddA--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/SPACE.com/Big_Bang%27s_Echo_May_Reveal-4a7a249136e4b70302ebf48a4cd9cb53" width="130" height="86" alt="Big Bang&#039;s Echo May Reveal Skeleton of the Universe" align="left" title="Big Bang&#039;s Echo May Reveal Skeleton of the Universe" border="0" /></a>Scientists may soon get a look at the universe&#039;s skeleton by taking a close look at light left over from the Big Bang, which can be used to reveal the presence of matter like stars, galaxies, black holes and even larger structures in the otherwise empty universe. In a similar way, scientists with the international POLARBEAR collaboration want to use a diffuse light that fills every corner of the cosmos to indicate where there is matter and where there is none. POLARBEAR studies the cosmic microwave background (CMB) — the surviving light from the infant universe that is normally seen a kind of baby picture of the cosmos. &quot;We&#039;re using the light that we&#039;ve usually used to measure the seeds of the structure of the universe, to measure the whole tree,&quot; said Adrian Lee, a professor of physics at the University of California Berkeley, and a lead scientist with POLARBEAR.</p><br clear="all"/>Famed Physicist Ernest Rutherford Helped Pioneer Sonar in Secret<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/famed-physicist-ernest-rutherford-helped-pioneer-sonar-secret-131224988.html"><img src="http://l2.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/rxElhuyF5MHlHFe5plRAVQ--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/LiveScience.com/shipwreck-11.jpg1415739822" width="130" height="86" alt="Famed Physicist Ernest Rutherford Helped Pioneer Sonar in Secret" align="left" title="Famed Physicist Ernest Rutherford Helped Pioneer Sonar in Secret" border="0" /></a>Ernest Rutherford is best-known for splitting the atom, but that&#039;s not his only claim to fame. The British physicist also helped pave the way for sonar technology. Rutherford produced a secret report during World War I that would form the basis for acoustic technology to detect German U-boats, which were a menace to the British Navy and merchant vessels. Now known as the father of nuclear physics, Rutherford became the first person to split an atom in 1917 in a reaction between nitrogen and alpha particles.</p><br clear="all"/>http://news.yahoo.com/famed-physicist-ernest-rutherford-helped-pioneer-sonar-secret-131224988.htmlMon, 17 Nov 2014 08:12:24 -0500LiveScience.comfamed-physicist-ernest-rutherford-helped-pioneer-sonar-secret-131224988<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/famed-physicist-ernest-rutherford-helped-pioneer-sonar-secret-131224988.html"><img src="http://l2.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/rxElhuyF5MHlHFe5plRAVQ--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/LiveScience.com/shipwreck-11.jpg1415739822" width="130" height="86" alt="Famed Physicist Ernest Rutherford Helped Pioneer Sonar in Secret" align="left" title="Famed Physicist Ernest Rutherford Helped Pioneer Sonar in Secret" border="0" /></a>Ernest Rutherford is best-known for splitting the atom, but that&#039;s not his only claim to fame. The British physicist also helped pave the way for sonar technology. Rutherford produced a secret report during World War I that would form the basis for acoustic technology to detect German U-boats, which were a menace to the British Navy and merchant vessels. Now known as the father of nuclear physics, Rutherford became the first person to split an atom in 1917 in a reaction between nitrogen and alpha particles.</p><br clear="all"/>Comet scientists take break after 4 straight days<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/comet-scientists-break-4-straight-days-165924252.html"><img src="http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/yOTLaZUFTyVNb6dsWva92A--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/ap_webfeeds/5627308412c6962d650f6a706700e2fb.jpg" width="130" height="86" alt="This is a combination photo of two images released by the European Space Agency, ESA, Sunday Nov. 16, 2014. ESA says it provides strong indication that Philae touched down for the first time almost precisely where intended. The photo on the left was taken about 3 min 34 sec before touchdown, the photo on the right 1 min 26 sec after by the navigation camera (NAVCAM) on board Rosetta as the orbiter flew over the (intended) Philae landing site on Nov. 12. The touchdown is seen as a dark area in the lower center of the right image which is considered as strong indication that the lander touched down at this spot (possibly raising dust from the impact). They were taken from a distance of about 15 km from the surface, Since landing Wednesday on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko some 311 million miles (500 million kilometers) away, the lander has performed a series of scientific tests. (AP Photo/ESA Rosetta/NAVCAM)" align="left" title="This is a combination photo of two images released by the European Space Agency, ESA, Sunday Nov. 16, 2014. ESA says it provides strong indication that Philae touched down for the first time almost precisely where intended. The photo on the left was taken about 3 min 34 sec before touchdown, the photo on the right 1 min 26 sec after by the navigation camera (NAVCAM) on board Rosetta as the orbiter flew over the (intended) Philae landing site on Nov. 12. The touchdown is seen as a dark area in the lower center of the right image which is considered as strong indication that the lander touched down at this spot (possibly raising dust from the impact). They were taken from a distance of about 15 km from the surface, Since landing Wednesday on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko some 311 million miles (500 million kilometers) away, the lander has performed a series of scientific tests. (AP Photo/ESA Rosetta/NAVCAM)" border="0" /></a>BERLIN (AP) — The European Space Agency says that its scientists are taking a bit of a break after working for four days around the clock since the pioneering lander Philae touched down on a comet.</p><br clear="all"/>http://news.yahoo.com/comet-scientists-break-4-straight-days-165924252.htmlSun, 16 Nov 2014 12:23:51 -0500Associated Presscomet-scientists-break-4-straight-days-165924252<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/comet-scientists-break-4-straight-days-165924252.html"><img src="http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/yOTLaZUFTyVNb6dsWva92A--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/ap_webfeeds/5627308412c6962d650f6a706700e2fb.jpg" width="130" height="86" alt="This is a combination photo of two images released by the European Space Agency, ESA, Sunday Nov. 16, 2014. ESA says it provides strong indication that Philae touched down for the first time almost precisely where intended. The photo on the left was taken about 3 min 34 sec before touchdown, the photo on the right 1 min 26 sec after by the navigation camera (NAVCAM) on board Rosetta as the orbiter flew over the (intended) Philae landing site on Nov. 12. The touchdown is seen as a dark area in the lower center of the right image which is considered as strong indication that the lander touched down at this spot (possibly raising dust from the impact). They were taken from a distance of about 15 km from the surface, Since landing Wednesday on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko some 311 million miles (500 million kilometers) away, the lander has performed a series of scientific tests. (AP Photo/ESA Rosetta/NAVCAM)" align="left" title="This is a combination photo of two images released by the European Space Agency, ESA, Sunday Nov. 16, 2014. ESA says it provides strong indication that Philae touched down for the first time almost precisely where intended. The photo on the left was taken about 3 min 34 sec before touchdown, the photo on the right 1 min 26 sec after by the navigation camera (NAVCAM) on board Rosetta as the orbiter flew over the (intended) Philae landing site on Nov. 12. The touchdown is seen as a dark area in the lower center of the right image which is considered as strong indication that the lander touched down at this spot (possibly raising dust from the impact). They were taken from a distance of about 15 km from the surface, Since landing Wednesday on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko some 311 million miles (500 million kilometers) away, the lander has performed a series of scientific tests. (AP Photo/ESA Rosetta/NAVCAM)" border="0" /></a>BERLIN (AP) — The European Space Agency says that its scientists are taking a bit of a break after working for four days around the clock since the pioneering lander Philae touched down on a comet.</p><br clear="all"/>Alien Life Could Thrive on 'Supercritical' CO2 Instead of Water<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/alien-life-could-thrive-supercritical-co2-instead-water-150041474.html"><img src="http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/usqTnAQltVIcBrB.BbmLIg--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/SPACE.com/Alien_Life_Could_Thrive_on-689a88e04ce06399560d8562703115e1" width="130" height="86" alt="Alien Life Could Thrive on &#039;Supercritical&#039; CO2 Instead of Water" align="left" title="Alien Life Could Thrive on &#039;Supercritical&#039; CO2 Instead of Water" border="0" /></a>Alien life might flourish on an exotic kind of carbon dioxide, researchers say. This &quot;supercritical&quot; carbon dioxide, which has features of both liquids and gases, could be key to extraterrestrial organisms much as water is to biology on Earth. Most familiar as a greenhouse gas that traps heat, helping warm the planet, carbon dioxide is exhaled by animals and used by plants in photosynthesis. While it can exist as a solid, liquid and gas, past a critical point of combined temperature and pressure, carbon dioxide can enter a &quot;supercritical&quot; state.</p><br clear="all"/>http://news.yahoo.com/alien-life-could-thrive-supercritical-co2-instead-water-150041474.htmlSun, 16 Nov 2014 10:00:41 -0500SPACE.comalien-life-could-thrive-supercritical-co2-instead-water-150041474<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/alien-life-could-thrive-supercritical-co2-instead-water-150041474.html"><img src="http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/usqTnAQltVIcBrB.BbmLIg--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/SPACE.com/Alien_Life_Could_Thrive_on-689a88e04ce06399560d8562703115e1" width="130" height="86" alt="Alien Life Could Thrive on &#039;Supercritical&#039; CO2 Instead of Water" align="left" title="Alien Life Could Thrive on &#039;Supercritical&#039; CO2 Instead of Water" border="0" /></a>Alien life might flourish on an exotic kind of carbon dioxide, researchers say. This &quot;supercritical&quot; carbon dioxide, which has features of both liquids and gases, could be key to extraterrestrial organisms much as water is to biology on Earth. Most familiar as a greenhouse gas that traps heat, helping warm the planet, carbon dioxide is exhaled by animals and used by plants in photosynthesis. While it can exist as a solid, liquid and gas, past a critical point of combined temperature and pressure, carbon dioxide can enter a &quot;supercritical&quot; state.</p><br clear="all"/>Space scientist apologizes for shirt called sexist<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/space-scientist-apologizes-shirt-called-sexist-153136164.html"><img src="http://l1.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/0y6t46_.Hhq_m5ZemeXvag--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/ap_webfeeds/c4e78008cb6b6a2c650f6a706700e943.jpg" width="130" height="86" alt="In this image issued from ESA, showing British physicist Matt Taylor Thursday Nov. 13, 2014, sporting a garish bowling shirt featuring a collage of pin-up girls in various states of undress, during an interview at the satellite control centre of the European Space Agency (ESA) in Darmstadt, Germany, on Thursday Nov. 13, 2014. On Friday Nov 14, Taylor offered an unsolicited apology about his shirt &quot;I made a big mistake and I offended many people,&quot; he said. &quot;And I&#039;m very sorry about this.&quot; (AP Photo/ESA) TV OUT - NO SALES" align="left" title="In this image issued from ESA, showing British physicist Matt Taylor Thursday Nov. 13, 2014, sporting a garish bowling shirt featuring a collage of pin-up girls in various states of undress, during an interview at the satellite control centre of the European Space Agency (ESA) in Darmstadt, Germany, on Thursday Nov. 13, 2014. On Friday Nov 14, Taylor offered an unsolicited apology about his shirt &quot;I made a big mistake and I offended many people,&quot; he said. &quot;And I&#039;m very sorry about this.&quot; (AP Photo/ESA) TV OUT - NO SALES" border="0" /></a>BERLIN (AP) — British physicist Matt Taylor brimmed with excitement as the European Space Agency&#039;s Philae lander successfully separated from the Rosetta spacecraft, showing off a colorful tattoo on his thigh of both, while proclaiming &quot;we&#039;re making history.&quot;</p><br clear="all"/>http://news.yahoo.com/space-scientist-apologizes-shirt-called-sexist-153136164.htmlFri, 14 Nov 2014 18:44:42 -0500Associated Pressspace-scientist-apologizes-shirt-called-sexist-153136164<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/space-scientist-apologizes-shirt-called-sexist-153136164.html"><img src="http://l1.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/0y6t46_.Hhq_m5ZemeXvag--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/ap_webfeeds/c4e78008cb6b6a2c650f6a706700e943.jpg" width="130" height="86" alt="In this image issued from ESA, showing British physicist Matt Taylor Thursday Nov. 13, 2014, sporting a garish bowling shirt featuring a collage of pin-up girls in various states of undress, during an interview at the satellite control centre of the European Space Agency (ESA) in Darmstadt, Germany, on Thursday Nov. 13, 2014. On Friday Nov 14, Taylor offered an unsolicited apology about his shirt &quot;I made a big mistake and I offended many people,&quot; he said. &quot;And I&#039;m very sorry about this.&quot; (AP Photo/ESA) TV OUT - NO SALES" align="left" title="In this image issued from ESA, showing British physicist Matt Taylor Thursday Nov. 13, 2014, sporting a garish bowling shirt featuring a collage of pin-up girls in various states of undress, during an interview at the satellite control centre of the European Space Agency (ESA) in Darmstadt, Germany, on Thursday Nov. 13, 2014. On Friday Nov 14, Taylor offered an unsolicited apology about his shirt &quot;I made a big mistake and I offended many people,&quot; he said. &quot;And I&#039;m very sorry about this.&quot; (AP Photo/ESA) TV OUT - NO SALES" border="0" /></a>BERLIN (AP) — British physicist Matt Taylor brimmed with excitement as the European Space Agency&#039;s Philae lander successfully separated from the Rosetta spacecraft, showing off a colorful tattoo on his thigh of both, while proclaiming &quot;we&#039;re making history.&quot;</p><br clear="all"/>'Nature's Fury': NYC Exhibit Explores Science of Natural Disasters<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/natures-fury-nyc-exhibit-explores-science-natural-disasters-132735582.html"><img src="http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/X2141sx1xKolzHBt9dH9FQ--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/LiveScience.com/Eruptingvolcano_UnitedStatesGeologicalSurvey-GEUlrich.jpg1415745480" width="130" height="86" alt="&#039;Nature&#039;s Fury&#039;: NYC Exhibit Explores Science of Natural Disasters" align="left" title="&#039;Nature&#039;s Fury&#039;: NYC Exhibit Explores Science of Natural Disasters" border="0" /></a>From the eruption that buried Pompeii in A.D. 79 to the superstorm that shut down New York City in 2012, natural disasters are an unavoidable part of life on Earth. A new exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) explores the causes and aftermath of the mighty forces that shape the planet, from earthquakes to volcanoes to hurricanes. The interactive exhibit lets visitors build their own virtual volcano, create and measure tiny earthquakes, and see what the eye of a tornado looks like. &quot;Nature&#039;s Fury: The Science Behind Natural Disasters&quot; will be open to the public from Nov. 15 to Aug. 9, 2015.</p><br clear="all"/>http://news.yahoo.com/natures-fury-nyc-exhibit-explores-science-natural-disasters-132735582.htmlFri, 14 Nov 2014 08:27:35 -0500LiveScience.comnatures-fury-nyc-exhibit-explores-science-natural-disasters-132735582<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/natures-fury-nyc-exhibit-explores-science-natural-disasters-132735582.html"><img src="http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/X2141sx1xKolzHBt9dH9FQ--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/LiveScience.com/Eruptingvolcano_UnitedStatesGeologicalSurvey-GEUlrich.jpg1415745480" width="130" height="86" alt="&#039;Nature&#039;s Fury&#039;: NYC Exhibit Explores Science of Natural Disasters" align="left" title="&#039;Nature&#039;s Fury&#039;: NYC Exhibit Explores Science of Natural Disasters" border="0" /></a>From the eruption that buried Pompeii in A.D. 79 to the superstorm that shut down New York City in 2012, natural disasters are an unavoidable part of life on Earth. A new exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) explores the causes and aftermath of the mighty forces that shape the planet, from earthquakes to volcanoes to hurricanes. The interactive exhibit lets visitors build their own virtual volcano, create and measure tiny earthquakes, and see what the eye of a tornado looks like. &quot;Nature&#039;s Fury: The Science Behind Natural Disasters&quot; will be open to the public from Nov. 15 to Aug. 9, 2015.</p><br clear="all"/>Professor sues Caltech over her disclosures to FBI<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/professor-sues-caltech-over-whistleblowing-181758712.html"><img src="http://l3.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/TfQ.rLzTKoHC9k3vjPtBXA--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/ap_webfeeds/bed2b7cfa7b1532c650f6a7067000376.jpg" width="130" height="86" alt="Sandra Troian, left, with her attorney Dan Stormer, talks during a news conference in Pasadena, Calif. on Thursday, Nov. 13, 2014. Troian a physics professor at the California Institute of Technology, sued the school Thursday, claiming she faced retaliation for telling the FBI that she suspected illegal activities at NASA&#039;s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Troian alleges that Caltech officials violated the school&#039;s own whistle blower policy by conducting a campaign of retaliation to &quot;drive her out of Caltech and ruin her career&quot; after she reported possible violations of federal export laws at JPL, which is managed by Caltech. (AP Photo/Christopher Weber)" align="left" title="Sandra Troian, left, with her attorney Dan Stormer, talks during a news conference in Pasadena, Calif. on Thursday, Nov. 13, 2014. Troian a physics professor at the California Institute of Technology, sued the school Thursday, claiming she faced retaliation for telling the FBI that she suspected illegal activities at NASA&#039;s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Troian alleges that Caltech officials violated the school&#039;s own whistle blower policy by conducting a campaign of retaliation to &quot;drive her out of Caltech and ruin her career&quot; after she reported possible violations of federal export laws at JPL, which is managed by Caltech. (AP Photo/Christopher Weber)" border="0" /></a>PASADENA, Calif. (AP) — A physics professor at the California Institute of Technology sued the school Thursday, claiming she faced a &quot;merciless campaign&quot; of retaliation for telling the FBI that she suspected illegal activities at the university-managed NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory.</p><br clear="all"/>http://news.yahoo.com/professor-sues-caltech-over-whistleblowing-181758712.htmlThu, 13 Nov 2014 20:45:47 -0500Associated Pressprofessor-sues-caltech-over-whistleblowing-181758712<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/professor-sues-caltech-over-whistleblowing-181758712.html"><img src="http://l3.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/TfQ.rLzTKoHC9k3vjPtBXA--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/ap_webfeeds/bed2b7cfa7b1532c650f6a7067000376.jpg" width="130" height="86" alt="Sandra Troian, left, with her attorney Dan Stormer, talks during a news conference in Pasadena, Calif. on Thursday, Nov. 13, 2014. Troian a physics professor at the California Institute of Technology, sued the school Thursday, claiming she faced retaliation for telling the FBI that she suspected illegal activities at NASA&#039;s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Troian alleges that Caltech officials violated the school&#039;s own whistle blower policy by conducting a campaign of retaliation to &quot;drive her out of Caltech and ruin her career&quot; after she reported possible violations of federal export laws at JPL, which is managed by Caltech. (AP Photo/Christopher Weber)" align="left" title="Sandra Troian, left, with her attorney Dan Stormer, talks during a news conference in Pasadena, Calif. on Thursday, Nov. 13, 2014. Troian a physics professor at the California Institute of Technology, sued the school Thursday, claiming she faced retaliation for telling the FBI that she suspected illegal activities at NASA&#039;s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Troian alleges that Caltech officials violated the school&#039;s own whistle blower policy by conducting a campaign of retaliation to &quot;drive her out of Caltech and ruin her career&quot; after she reported possible violations of federal export laws at JPL, which is managed by Caltech. (AP Photo/Christopher Weber)" border="0" /></a>PASADENA, Calif. (AP) — A physics professor at the California Institute of Technology sued the school Thursday, claiming she faced a &quot;merciless campaign&quot; of retaliation for telling the FBI that she suspected illegal activities at the university-managed NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory.</p><br clear="all"/>Global Warming Will Bring More US Lightning StrikesA 50 percent increase in the number of lightning strikes within the United States can be expected by 2100 if temperatures continue to rise due to greenhouse gas emissions, a new study claims. Romps and his colleagues discovered a new combination of two factors that they say predicts 77 percent of the geographic and time patterns seen in U.S.http://news.yahoo.com/global-warming-bring-more-us-lightning-strikes-193201346.htmlThu, 13 Nov 2014 14:32:01 -0500LiveScience.comglobal-warming-bring-more-us-lightning-strikes-193201346Scientists: US-China pact won't slow warming much<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/us-china-climate-deal-aims-prod-others-act-091201821--politics.html"><img src="http://l2.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/ng8y8lxnv5hIzRXmc2t8zg--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/ap_webfeeds/b9a1f6cb814b302c650f6a7067006c4d.jpg" width="130" height="86" alt="U.S. President Barack Obama, left, and Chinese President Xi Jinping drink a toast at a lunch banquet in the Great Hall of the People in Beijing Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014. Obama is on a state visit after attending the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit. The United States and China pledged Wednesday to take ambitious action to limit greenhouse gases, aiming to inject fresh momentum into the global fight against climate change ahead of high-stakes climate negotiations next year. (AP Photo/Greg Baker, Pool)" align="left" title="U.S. President Barack Obama, left, and Chinese President Xi Jinping drink a toast at a lunch banquet in the Great Hall of the People in Beijing Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014. Obama is on a state visit after attending the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit. The United States and China pledged Wednesday to take ambitious action to limit greenhouse gases, aiming to inject fresh momentum into the global fight against climate change ahead of high-stakes climate negotiations next year. (AP Photo/Greg Baker, Pool)" border="0" /></a>WASHINGTON (AP) — Don&#039;t expect the landmark U.S.-China climate change agreement to nudge the world&#039;s rising thermostat downward much on its own, scientists say.</p><br clear="all"/>http://news.yahoo.com/us-china-climate-deal-aims-prod-others-act-091201821--politics.htmlWed, 12 Nov 2014 19:29:39 -0500Associated Pressus-china-climate-deal-aims-prod-others-act-091201821--politics<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/us-china-climate-deal-aims-prod-others-act-091201821--politics.html"><img src="http://l2.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/ng8y8lxnv5hIzRXmc2t8zg--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/ap_webfeeds/b9a1f6cb814b302c650f6a7067006c4d.jpg" width="130" height="86" alt="U.S. President Barack Obama, left, and Chinese President Xi Jinping drink a toast at a lunch banquet in the Great Hall of the People in Beijing Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014. Obama is on a state visit after attending the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit. The United States and China pledged Wednesday to take ambitious action to limit greenhouse gases, aiming to inject fresh momentum into the global fight against climate change ahead of high-stakes climate negotiations next year. (AP Photo/Greg Baker, Pool)" align="left" title="U.S. President Barack Obama, left, and Chinese President Xi Jinping drink a toast at a lunch banquet in the Great Hall of the People in Beijing Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014. Obama is on a state visit after attending the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit. The United States and China pledged Wednesday to take ambitious action to limit greenhouse gases, aiming to inject fresh momentum into the global fight against climate change ahead of high-stakes climate negotiations next year. (AP Photo/Greg Baker, Pool)" border="0" /></a>WASHINGTON (AP) — Don&#039;t expect the landmark U.S.-China climate change agreement to nudge the world&#039;s rising thermostat downward much on its own, scientists say.</p><br clear="all"/>World's Oldest Living People Have Their Genomes Sequenced<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/worlds-oldest-living-people-genomes-sequenced-000758970.html"><img src="http://l2.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/Cptt7yx1eWavWdtKVkU3xg--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/LiveScience.com/elderly-couple-100402-hf.jpg1296084297" width="130" height="86" alt="World&#039;s Oldest Living People Have Their Genomes Sequenced" align="left" title="World&#039;s Oldest Living People Have Their Genomes Sequenced" border="0" /></a>Many of these so-called &quot;supercentenarians&quot; were physically and cognitively fit into their old age — one participant practiced as a doctor until age 103, and another drove a car until age 107. The ultimate goal of the research is to figure out how supercentenarians are able to &quot;slow down the aging clock,&quot; said study co-author Stuart Kim, a professor of developmental biology at Stanford University. None of the supercentenarians in the study had heart disease, stroke or diabetes — diseases that are very common in old age — and just one participant had been diagnosed with cancer. &quot;The best way forward is for people to pool their data so we can compare all the supercentenarians,&quot; Kim said.</p><br clear="all"/>http://news.yahoo.com/worlds-oldest-living-people-genomes-sequenced-000758970.htmlWed, 12 Nov 2014 19:07:58 -0500LiveScience.comworlds-oldest-living-people-genomes-sequenced-000758970<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/worlds-oldest-living-people-genomes-sequenced-000758970.html"><img src="http://l2.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/Cptt7yx1eWavWdtKVkU3xg--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/LiveScience.com/elderly-couple-100402-hf.jpg1296084297" width="130" height="86" alt="World&#039;s Oldest Living People Have Their Genomes Sequenced" align="left" title="World&#039;s Oldest Living People Have Their Genomes Sequenced" border="0" /></a>Many of these so-called &quot;supercentenarians&quot; were physically and cognitively fit into their old age — one participant practiced as a doctor until age 103, and another drove a car until age 107. The ultimate goal of the research is to figure out how supercentenarians are able to &quot;slow down the aging clock,&quot; said study co-author Stuart Kim, a professor of developmental biology at Stanford University. None of the supercentenarians in the study had heart disease, stroke or diabetes — diseases that are very common in old age — and just one participant had been diagnosed with cancer. &quot;The best way forward is for people to pool their data so we can compare all the supercentenarians,&quot; Kim said.</p><br clear="all"/>Scientists scour the genomes of people who live past 110<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/scientists-scour-genomes-people-live-past-110-194749114.html"><img src="http://l2.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/iFE_MI7shgCpBEz9BGsO.Q--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/Reuters/2014-11-12T194749Z_1_LYNXNPEAAB15U_RTROPTP_2_SCIENCE-AGING.JPG" width="130" height="86" alt="File photo of Talley sits at the head table with her friend during a celebration of her 115th birthday at the New Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church in Inkster" align="left" title="File photo of Talley sits at the head table with her friend during a celebration of her 115th birthday at the New Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church in Inkster" border="0" /></a>By Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - How do some people live past 110 years old? Is it superior genes, clean living, good luck or some combination of those? Scientists studying these &quot;supercentenarians&quot; said on Wednesday they sequenced the genomes of 17 people ages 110 to 116 to try to determine whether they possess genetic traits that may account for their membership in this exclusive club that worldwide includes only about 75 individuals, nearly all women. ...</p><br clear="all"/>http://news.yahoo.com/scientists-scour-genomes-people-live-past-110-194749114.htmlWed, 12 Nov 2014 14:47:49 -0500Reutersscientists-scour-genomes-people-live-past-110-194749114<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/scientists-scour-genomes-people-live-past-110-194749114.html"><img src="http://l2.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/iFE_MI7shgCpBEz9BGsO.Q--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/Reuters/2014-11-12T194749Z_1_LYNXNPEAAB15U_RTROPTP_2_SCIENCE-AGING.JPG" width="130" height="86" alt="File photo of Talley sits at the head table with her friend during a celebration of her 115th birthday at the New Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church in Inkster" align="left" title="File photo of Talley sits at the head table with her friend during a celebration of her 115th birthday at the New Jerusalem Missionary Baptist Church in Inkster" border="0" /></a>By Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - How do some people live past 110 years old? Is it superior genes, clean living, good luck or some combination of those? Scientists studying these &quot;supercentenarians&quot; said on Wednesday they sequenced the genomes of 17 people ages 110 to 116 to try to determine whether they possess genetic traits that may account for their membership in this exclusive club that worldwide includes only about 75 individuals, nearly all women. ...</p><br clear="all"/>L'Aquila Earthquake Scientists Win Manslaughter Appeal<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/laquila-earthquake-scientists-win-manslaughter-appeal-133954643.html"><img src="http://l2.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/_L5BcyDZPAJnBqrFQdYnqA--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/LiveScience.com/laquila-earthquake-village.jpg1412252681" width="130" height="86" alt="L&#039;Aquila Earthquake Scientists Win Manslaughter Appeal" align="left" title="L&#039;Aquila Earthquake Scientists Win Manslaughter Appeal" border="0" /></a>The Italian scientists convicted of manslaughter for failing to sufficiently warn the public before the deadly 2009 L&#039;Aquila earthquake won an appeal of their conviction Monday (Nov. 10). An appeals court in L&#039;Aquila overturned the 2012 convictions and completely cleared the six scientists, according to the Associated Press. The men were members of an official commission convened to evaluate the threat from tremors that had rocked L&#039;Aquila for months before a magnitude-6.3 quake killed 309 people on April 6, 2009. Prosecutors said reassuring statements from the official, Bernardo De Bernardinis, convinced L&#039;Aquila residents to sleep indoors the night of the earthquake, which increased the number of people who died in collapsed buildings.</p><br clear="all"/>http://news.yahoo.com/laquila-earthquake-scientists-win-manslaughter-appeal-133954643.htmlWed, 12 Nov 2014 08:39:54 -0500LiveScience.comlaquila-earthquake-scientists-win-manslaughter-appeal-133954643<p><a href="http://news.yahoo.com/laquila-earthquake-scientists-win-manslaughter-appeal-133954643.html"><img src="http://l2.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/_L5BcyDZPAJnBqrFQdYnqA--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg2O3E9NzU7dz0xMzA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_US/News/LiveScience.com/laquila-earthquake-village.jpg1412252681" width="130" height="86" alt="L&#039;Aquila Earthquake Scientists Win Manslaughter Appeal" align="left" title="L&#039;Aquila Earthquake Scientists Win Manslaughter Appeal" border="0" /></a>The Italian scientists convicted of manslaughter for failing to sufficiently warn the public before the deadly 2009 L&#039;Aquila earthquake won an appeal of their conviction Monday (Nov. 10). An appeals court in L&#039;Aquila overturned the 2012 convictions and completely cleared the six scientists, according to the Associated Press. The men were members of an official commission convened to evaluate the threat from tremors that had rocked L&#039;Aquila for months before a magnitude-6.3 quake killed 309 people on April 6, 2009. Prosecutors said reassuring statements from the official, Bernardo De Bernardinis, convinced L&#039;Aquila residents to sleep indoors the night of the earthquake, which increased the number of people who died in collapsed buildings.</p><br clear="all"/>